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Connect The Independent Art Fair at Mall Galleries – 29 January - 2 February 2020

 

 

Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair
 

   Peter Sainsbury, Tyne Street, Stepney.: "The 1950s and ‘60s were full of grand plans for the future of London and here we see an architect’s impression of a proposed Tower Block development in Stepney, I don’t think it was ever built."

 


Event: Connect Art Fair
Organiser: Connect Art Fair Committee
Venue: The Mall Galleries
The Mall, St. James's, London SW1
Date: 29 January – 2 February 2020

Enquiries:

Tel: 07932 618754

 Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair 30 Jan - 2 Feb 2020

Sarah Colegrave Fine Art: 18 Motcombe Street, Knightsbridge by John Cole, £2,500

ABOUT THIS FAIR:

Connect – The Independent Art Fair, organised by a dealer co-operative, will open its doors at Mall Galleries, London SW1, to collectors and art lovers on Thursday, 30 January until 2 February 2020. This is the second edition of the fair, which will have a special London focus with works by artists trained at the best London art schools and embracing London in their art – from  famous landmarks to everyday life. 'London Calling' is celebrating the diversity of the city and its artists.

This year, it will be open all weekend closing at 4pm on Sunday, 2 February and entry is £10 or sign up for free tickets online. A special preview will be held on Wednesday, 29 January by invitation only and a limited amount of tickets will be available for £25 each. Visitors can expect an excellent mix of dealers providing something for everyone's taste with prices averaging from £500 to £20,000, but with plenty of works from as little as £100 and with the top price tag at £200,000. 

'London Calling' London is famous for its art scene – there is a public gallery and an art school in almost every district of London with many smaller galleries and art dealers alongside. Mall Galleries is in the heart land with the National Gallery, Portrait Gallery and Royal Academy just a short walk away as well as the leading auction houses and some of the oldest art dealers. Artists have been drawn to record London's architecture, views of the Thames, the palaces, backstreets and parks – Canaletto’s views of London are as prized as those of Venice, Monet's fogbound Westminster more magical than Paris. You will see evidence of artists trained by the best of London's art schools and famous artists paying homage to London throughout the Fair.

Highlights include:

Sarah Colegrave Fine Art will bring a separate exhibition 'Paintings of London by Rex Vicat Cole and John Cole'.  Rex Vicat Cole was the third of four generations of London painters. An influential and well-respected teacher associated with the school that bore his name, the Byam Shaw and Vicat Cole School of Art in Kensington. He earned his reputation as a painter of landscapes much in the tradition of his famous painter father and grandfather, but was at heart a Londoner and by the mid 1920s he would increasingly record the history and architecture of his home city. Many of these views would soon be lost forever, victims of the Blitz in the 1940s and the extensive re-development of the Post-War city. Vicat Coles’s works show the strong imprint of their time through the cars, people, cafes and shop fronts; and of a city slowly emerging from the dark shadow of the Depression. Although Rex Vicat Cole’s son John superficially appeared to continue closely in his father’s footsteps, he asserted an early independence and he exhibited some 100 works at the Royal Academy (nearly every year from the mid 1930s until his death in 1975). Cole’s signature subject was the London shop front in bold straightforward compositions that have often been described as “portraits of shops”, Cole would become so strongly associated with this subject that the critic of the Sphere described Cole in 1949 as the “artist to a nation of shopkeepers.”

Fifties Art brings some exceptional works by artists, who worked in post-war London, including by Richard Platt (1928-2013). His lithograph ‘Caribbeans Playing Pinball’  was completed only 2 years after the arrival of the Empire Windrush in 1950 and shows the impact the post-war migrants from the Caribbean must have had on a drab London scene.

Gwen Hughes Fine Art will be bringing a collection of Dick Lee paintings – 6 in total, all of the Thames / West London. Dick Lee lived in Barnes in the 1960s and he very much painted in and around that area.

Blondes Fine Art will be showing a wide range of artists and works include the original signed artwork by Royal fashion designer Ian Thomas for the design of the blue chiffon outfit HM Queen wore for Charles and Diana's wedding. On the other end of the spectrum is the studio collection of Jo Brocklehurst, considered to be the 'Hogarth' of contemporary London night life. She is best known for her portrayals of the London Punk community during the 1980s. Her studies of these flamboyant characters include Billy Idol and Souxie Sioux. She captured the spiky defiant ‘edge' of these rebellious youngsters with fluid inky drawings and watercolours like a current day Egon Schiele.

Amanda Aldous Fine Art is bringing abstract works by Jean Noble RI, which is based on around the Docklands and the Thames. Jean takes her inspiration from the vibrant and burgeoning city extending out to 'Docklands'. She loves the buzz, the cranes, the wonderful emerging buildings encroaching along the Thames.

The Art Stable will have a wide range of London works on the stand, and contemporary artists William Wright does pastel drawings of the view from his window in SE London. His works are often described as minimal, but the fact that details have been taken out make them quiet and distilled observations of his immediate environment.

 Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair 30 Jan - 2 Feb 2020

Mark Goodman: one of the Stripe Paintings by Bridget Riley



Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair 30 Jan - 2 Feb 2020


Blondes Fine Art: London Punk by Jo Brocklehurst


WHY YOU SHOULD VISIT THIS FAIR:

Mark Goodman will be bringing some important Bridget Riley works on paper. She is of course hugely fashionable at the moment with the Hayward show which ends just before the Fair opens. Mark will stage a mini Riley show with much more affordable prints with prices ranging from £8,000 to £200,000, possibly the highest value work at the Fair.

In contrast Elizabeth Harvey-Lee will bring a Canaletto. Canaletto dominated topographical painting in Venice in the first half of the 18th century and his 'vedute' (views) were much collected by visiting British grand tourists. This patronage led him to dedicate the first collected edition of his etchings "Vedute", published c1644, to the British Consul in Venice. Canaletto had taken up etching in the later 1730's and before he abandoned the technique in 1746, produced thirty-four plates. Whether topographical or capriccio views, they sparkle with Veneto light and are imbued with the essence of the Rococo. 'La Terrazza' from circa 1740-44 comes from the collection of Dr Dominique Franquet and carries an asking price of £3,000.

Francis Iles will be bringing a collection of eight Austin Spare drawings to the Fair. Many will need no introduction to Spare’s unique life story and life’s work, and will be fascinated to see these previously unseen works. They are typical of his automatic drawings.  Spare was born in 1886 and was apprenticed at the age of 13 to a stained glass maker, and in his teenage years became fascinated with the occult.  His friendship with a witch led him to develop pictorial sigils and Spare would often produce fully worked drawings, apparently while he was asleep.

Robert Eagle will be showing six new-to-the market oil paintings by John Bellany, the roaring boy of British 20th century art, renowned for his striking, sometimes macabre imagery that was inspired by life in the Calvinist - and deeply superstitious - Scottish fishing community in which he was brought up. Strange fish and creatures of the deep were a frequent motif of his work, and he drank like a fish too until his alcoholism overtook him and he underwent a liver transplant in 1988. He died in 2013, aged 71, shortly after a major retrospective at the National Gallery of Scotland in Edinburgh. His work can be seen in Tate Modern, the National Portrait Gallery as well as the MOMA and the Metropolitan in New York. These works come from a close relative who was gifted them by the artist. Prices will range from £3,000 to £7,000.

Fox House Fine Art specialises in a wide range of artists, among them works by Ralston Gudgeon 1910-1984, Scottish artist and graduate of the Glasgow School of Art. The prolific wildlife painter, who combines great knowledge of birds and mammals with the jewel-like hues of the Scottish Colourists. He was well-known for always wearing a kilt, carrying his paints, brushes and pencils in his sporran.

The Fair supports The Artists General Benevolent Institution (AGBI) and is delighted that William Packer, the art critic and artist, has kindly agreed to guide a special tour around the Fair on Friday, 31st January at noon. This will be on a first-come-first-served basis. The tour will be free, but donations to the charity are welcome.

The Fair provides a wide platform with no overall designation of genre or era other than the criteria being good vetted quality at sensible prices. The 34 dealers will be showing a wide array of all styles, from the traditional qualities of the 16th century to the current contemporary, with a good backbone of the much loved 20th century schools - from St Ives to British Abstract with a sprinkling of Scandinavian mid-century modern.


Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair 30 Jan - 2 Feb 2020
 

The Art Stable: View from my window by William Wright

TICKET INFO:

Admission to the fair is £3.50. For more information visit Penman Antiques Fairs

 

 

 

Cover Image:  Blondes Fine Art: London Punk by Jo Brocklehurst










News & Fairs Previews

Connect The Independent Art Fair at Mall Galleries – 29 January - 2 February 2020

 

 

Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair
 

   Peter Sainsbury, Tyne Street, Stepney.: "The 1950s and ‘60s were full of grand plans for the future of London and here we see an architect’s impression of a proposed Tower Block development in Stepney, I don’t think it was ever built."

 


Event: Connect Art Fair
Organiser: Connect Art Fair Committee
Venue: The Mall Galleries
The Mall, St. James's, London SW1
Date: 29 January – 2 February 2020

Enquiries:

Tel: 07932 618754

 Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair 30 Jan - 2 Feb 2020

Sarah Colegrave Fine Art: 18 Motcombe Street, Knightsbridge by John Cole, £2,500

ABOUT THIS FAIR:

Connect – The Independent Art Fair, organised by a dealer co-operative, will open its doors at Mall Galleries, London SW1, to collectors and art lovers on Thursday, 30 January until 2 February 2020. This is the second edition of the fair, which will have a special London focus with works by artists trained at the best London art schools and embracing London in their art – from  famous landmarks to everyday life. 'London Calling' is celebrating the diversity of the city and its artists.

This year, it will be open all weekend closing at 4pm on Sunday, 2 February and entry is £10 or sign up for free tickets online. A special preview will be held on Wednesday, 29 January by invitation only and a limited amount of tickets will be available for £25 each. Visitors can expect an excellent mix of dealers providing something for everyone's taste with prices averaging from £500 to £20,000, but with plenty of works from as little as £100 and with the top price tag at £200,000. 

'London Calling' London is famous for its art scene – there is a public gallery and an art school in almost every district of London with many smaller galleries and art dealers alongside. Mall Galleries is in the heart land with the National Gallery, Portrait Gallery and Royal Academy just a short walk away as well as the leading auction houses and some of the oldest art dealers. Artists have been drawn to record London's architecture, views of the Thames, the palaces, backstreets and parks – Canaletto’s views of London are as prized as those of Venice, Monet's fogbound Westminster more magical than Paris. You will see evidence of artists trained by the best of London's art schools and famous artists paying homage to London throughout the Fair.

Highlights include:

Sarah Colegrave Fine Art will bring a separate exhibition 'Paintings of London by Rex Vicat Cole and John Cole'.  Rex Vicat Cole was the third of four generations of London painters. An influential and well-respected teacher associated with the school that bore his name, the Byam Shaw and Vicat Cole School of Art in Kensington. He earned his reputation as a painter of landscapes much in the tradition of his famous painter father and grandfather, but was at heart a Londoner and by the mid 1920s he would increasingly record the history and architecture of his home city. Many of these views would soon be lost forever, victims of the Blitz in the 1940s and the extensive re-development of the Post-War city. Vicat Coles’s works show the strong imprint of their time through the cars, people, cafes and shop fronts; and of a city slowly emerging from the dark shadow of the Depression. Although Rex Vicat Cole’s son John superficially appeared to continue closely in his father’s footsteps, he asserted an early independence and he exhibited some 100 works at the Royal Academy (nearly every year from the mid 1930s until his death in 1975). Cole’s signature subject was the London shop front in bold straightforward compositions that have often been described as “portraits of shops”, Cole would become so strongly associated with this subject that the critic of the Sphere described Cole in 1949 as the “artist to a nation of shopkeepers.”

Fifties Art brings some exceptional works by artists, who worked in post-war London, including by Richard Platt (1928-2013). His lithograph ‘Caribbeans Playing Pinball’  was completed only 2 years after the arrival of the Empire Windrush in 1950 and shows the impact the post-war migrants from the Caribbean must have had on a drab London scene.

Gwen Hughes Fine Art will be bringing a collection of Dick Lee paintings – 6 in total, all of the Thames / West London. Dick Lee lived in Barnes in the 1960s and he very much painted in and around that area.

Blondes Fine Art will be showing a wide range of artists and works include the original signed artwork by Royal fashion designer Ian Thomas for the design of the blue chiffon outfit HM Queen wore for Charles and Diana's wedding. On the other end of the spectrum is the studio collection of Jo Brocklehurst, considered to be the 'Hogarth' of contemporary London night life. She is best known for her portrayals of the London Punk community during the 1980s. Her studies of these flamboyant characters include Billy Idol and Souxie Sioux. She captured the spiky defiant ‘edge' of these rebellious youngsters with fluid inky drawings and watercolours like a current day Egon Schiele.

Amanda Aldous Fine Art is bringing abstract works by Jean Noble RI, which is based on around the Docklands and the Thames. Jean takes her inspiration from the vibrant and burgeoning city extending out to 'Docklands'. She loves the buzz, the cranes, the wonderful emerging buildings encroaching along the Thames.

The Art Stable will have a wide range of London works on the stand, and contemporary artists William Wright does pastel drawings of the view from his window in SE London. His works are often described as minimal, but the fact that details have been taken out make them quiet and distilled observations of his immediate environment.

 Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair 30 Jan - 2 Feb 2020

Mark Goodman: one of the Stripe Paintings by Bridget Riley



Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair 30 Jan - 2 Feb 2020


Blondes Fine Art: London Punk by Jo Brocklehurst


WHY YOU SHOULD VISIT THIS FAIR:

Mark Goodman will be bringing some important Bridget Riley works on paper. She is of course hugely fashionable at the moment with the Hayward show which ends just before the Fair opens. Mark will stage a mini Riley show with much more affordable prints with prices ranging from £8,000 to £200,000, possibly the highest value work at the Fair.

In contrast Elizabeth Harvey-Lee will bring a Canaletto. Canaletto dominated topographical painting in Venice in the first half of the 18th century and his 'vedute' (views) were much collected by visiting British grand tourists. This patronage led him to dedicate the first collected edition of his etchings "Vedute", published c1644, to the British Consul in Venice. Canaletto had taken up etching in the later 1730's and before he abandoned the technique in 1746, produced thirty-four plates. Whether topographical or capriccio views, they sparkle with Veneto light and are imbued with the essence of the Rococo. 'La Terrazza' from circa 1740-44 comes from the collection of Dr Dominique Franquet and carries an asking price of £3,000.

Francis Iles will be bringing a collection of eight Austin Spare drawings to the Fair. Many will need no introduction to Spare’s unique life story and life’s work, and will be fascinated to see these previously unseen works. They are typical of his automatic drawings.  Spare was born in 1886 and was apprenticed at the age of 13 to a stained glass maker, and in his teenage years became fascinated with the occult.  His friendship with a witch led him to develop pictorial sigils and Spare would often produce fully worked drawings, apparently while he was asleep.

Robert Eagle will be showing six new-to-the market oil paintings by John Bellany, the roaring boy of British 20th century art, renowned for his striking, sometimes macabre imagery that was inspired by life in the Calvinist - and deeply superstitious - Scottish fishing community in which he was brought up. Strange fish and creatures of the deep were a frequent motif of his work, and he drank like a fish too until his alcoholism overtook him and he underwent a liver transplant in 1988. He died in 2013, aged 71, shortly after a major retrospective at the National Gallery of Scotland in Edinburgh. His work can be seen in Tate Modern, the National Portrait Gallery as well as the MOMA and the Metropolitan in New York. These works come from a close relative who was gifted them by the artist. Prices will range from £3,000 to £7,000.

Fox House Fine Art specialises in a wide range of artists, among them works by Ralston Gudgeon 1910-1984, Scottish artist and graduate of the Glasgow School of Art. The prolific wildlife painter, who combines great knowledge of birds and mammals with the jewel-like hues of the Scottish Colourists. He was well-known for always wearing a kilt, carrying his paints, brushes and pencils in his sporran.

The Fair supports The Artists General Benevolent Institution (AGBI) and is delighted that William Packer, the art critic and artist, has kindly agreed to guide a special tour around the Fair on Friday, 31st January at noon. This will be on a first-come-first-served basis. The tour will be free, but donations to the charity are welcome.

The Fair provides a wide platform with no overall designation of genre or era other than the criteria being good vetted quality at sensible prices. The 34 dealers will be showing a wide array of all styles, from the traditional qualities of the 16th century to the current contemporary, with a good backbone of the much loved 20th century schools - from St Ives to British Abstract with a sprinkling of Scandinavian mid-century modern.


Antiques News & Fairs - Connect Art Fair 30 Jan - 2 Feb 2020
 

The Art Stable: View from my window by William Wright

TICKET INFO:

Admission to the fair is £3.50. For more information visit Penman Antiques Fairs

 

 

 

Cover Image:  Blondes Fine Art: London Punk by Jo Brocklehurst