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News & Fairs Previews

An Eye on the Calendar - Darren Hudson - The Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair

Continuing our series An Eye on the Calendar we talk to Darren Hudson, Director of the Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair which was planned to open on Thursday May 14 - Monday May 18 2020 -  the first year with new calendar dates to avoid the Easter Holiday.


Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair

 

Affectionately known in the trade as ‘Battersea’, this is the Titan event of the international decorative trade taking place 3 times a year and forming the cornerstone of the business of many of its 180 exhibitors from UK and Europe. Darren speaks candidly about the challenges they face as a central London event with heavy contractual commitments and how they are keeping the Battersea club spirit going during the crisis the industry is dealing with.

To set the scene we wanted to include this wonderful endorsement of the Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair from leading decorative dealer Spencer Swaffer (written for the occasion of the Fair’s 30th birthday in 2015):


"Antiques dealers are basically loners who plough their own furrows. What makes Battersea unique is the way it unites a whole band of competitive hunters into a united, amiable bunch of friends for a few days three times a year.  It is that cheerfulness which shines out of Battersea and makes it such a joy to visit. Anywhere that allows dogs clearly has its heart in the right place.  Being first in the queue of buyers, first out of the traps and into the stands, has always been a closely fought battle. It [the opening day queue] used to be the domain of two of the greatest dealers of the late 20th century, the late Guinevere Weaver, who'd leave her Kings Road store early doors to be first in line, and the late Toby Landey, flying in from New York to buy for her Sentimento store.  They knew they'd find great things. We all knew we'd learn something: a new theme, a new look, a subtle nuance, a way of putting things together, a different finish for a standard bit of furniture, a twist of old fabric to jazz up a chair.  Battersea taught us the values of rust, the brutalist shock of industrial, that bleach isn't just something to throw down the toilet but a way to transform a dull commode. Battersea rules and under the amiable ownership of the excellent David Juran it has reached new heights encouraging new dealers and attracting the old guard from more stuffy shows." Spencer Swaffer.

Read the full history of The Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair in our feature to celebrate the 30th Anniversary in our feature Antiques & Design Listing - Battersea


Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair



An Eye on the Calendar -

Darren Hudson, Director The Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair


ANF:  You were a dealer and long time exhibitor and subsequently turned co-organiser of this stellar, established and celebrated fair brand - tell us how you navigated this route after David died.

David was very much a leader and a force of nature at the fair and in the antiques trade and is much missed by us all.  He was a benefactor to many, Mark Hill and I remember his generosity in hosting the launch of Antiques Young Guns with a huge stand and a catered launch party with his friend Nicky Haslam to present the awards – this was typical of his endorsement of the trade.

You were close friends and he introduced you to your wife Amber.  How did you navigate this difficult path and what do you think David would say about how you and Jane Juran, his wife, and the team have taken the fair on?

DH: It’s no secret that David and I were close. Anyone who has lost a close friend will know how that feels.

Initially I offered to oversee the next Fair which was only a few months away. It seemed sensible having spent so much time around the Fair and having an understanding of the logistics. I had spent a lot of time with David’s family and consequently Jane was also a friend. Without exception everyone in the Team, the contractors and the exhibitors were amazing. Not one person moaned, everyone just got on with it.

After our Autumn Fair Jane decided that she would like to continue running the Fairs and assume the helm. She asked if I would help, and offer a dealer prospective. It was paramount that something that she and David had worked so hard for should continue, but only on an upward trajectory. Understandably I accepted. It was important for me to support Jane and help protect what was such an important Fair for dealers and myself.

Jane and I work well together. She is determined to maintain it as dealer-focused Fair. We tend to be on the same page all of the time and have the best interests of The Fair at heart. I know I can talk to her about anything. With a small but dedicated team alongside us I hope we produce a vibrant and exciting event to visit, and a successful and friendly Fair to exhibit at. Just as with David, exhibitors can find one of us at any time to discuss concerns, issues or just have a drink. It’s still a Family Fair both in the organisational team and the exhibitors.  I like to think that the Fair is something that David would be proud of. I’m proud to be part of its journey. I know for certain that he would be pleased that the Fair was looking as well as it is, though there is no doubt he would be furious that he’s missing out on all that dealing! 

 

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair


ANF:  What was your first job and did it prepare you for the vagaries of the antiques trade – and its members!

DH: Apart from the number of mundane jobs just to earn some money, from a very early age I had decided on a career as an actor. I pursued this for many years with my first professional job at the age of 12. I continued working off and on for a further 20 years. Although in some ways it seems miles apart from the antique trade, the similarities are many. Both have a mix of characters and a very similar outlook on life. Both have people who work incredibly hard with distorted hours and whose skills and dedication isn’t always recognised as much as it should be. People skills are important in both, as is being able to interact with people from all walks of life. In addition many antiques dealers I have met deserve to be on the stage!

ANF:  When did you start dealing? We heard you started with Patricia Harvey who was of course the Grand Dame of Battersea as the founder more than 35 years ago! What was your breakout moment to go it alone?

DH: The fantastic Patricia was a dancer in her youth and therefore had a soft spot for people in the arts. She took me under her wing and allowed me to continue with acting jobs as they came in along with teaching me what she did best. I watched her run the Decorative Fair, helping in the office and progressed to running her shop in Marylebone’s Church Street. I also helped out at her weekly Sunday Fairs. Almost immediately the fascination of this amazing industry grabbed me. It was only a matter of time before the purchases initially made for myself became purchases made to sell on. Patricia and her daughter Victoria were very supportive and bought most of my early acquisitions.... MOST of which she sold. She encouraged me to exhibit at the Decorative Fair when the time was right. Probably as she couldn’t remain my only customer! I can’t remember in what year but it was over 20 years ago!

 

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair


 

ANF:  Talking to your long-standing exhibitors at The Decorative Fair, how do you think they compare the fair today from the 80s?  How many of your current roster were there at the beginning?

DH: ‘The 80’s were fantastic’ is the usual comment I hear. The economy was booming and many couldn’t buy it as quickly as they could sell it. The Decorative market was just emerging and the export market was strong. Cash was king. In the years in between business has undoubtedly got more difficult with recessions coming and going. Shops are less attractive for some and the internet has established its place as a selling format - and when was the last time someone paid in cash??

We have quite a few dealers who were with us at the fairs in the 80’s, some who were at our very first Fair, and who have supported and followed the Fair to its present home in Battersea. We also actively encourage new younger dealers to ensure the business continues with their fresh take on things. The general consensus is that while the Fairs of the 80’s are fondly remembered The Decorative Fair is stronger than ever. It has allowed some to relinquish their shops and concentrate on preparing for three big selling weeks in their calendar. The brand new Marquee and its central location allow many dealers access to clients they would struggle to meet otherwise. Where else could a relatively new dealer have access to a billionaire, a movie star or a member of the Royal Family? It still allows an outlet for the weird and wonderful alongside the day to day staples with everything in between. The Fair retains its sense of fun and comradeship. ‘The Buzz’ is a word often associated with The Decorative Fair along with ‘The Battersea Family’ and hopefully that will continue for the next 35 years.

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair


ANF:There is no denying or escaping the fact that fair organisers and the dealers who exhibit with them, have been hit very hard in the current crisis.  What are your thoughts and plans for when we come out the other side? Do you have anything planned to celebrate your return?

DH: This crisis hit very quickly and initially we underestimated its impact. Both Jane and I were determined to go ahead and like most dealers continue in the face of adversity. As the realisation of the seriousness became clear we were forced to make the incredibly difficult decision to cancel for the safety of us all. We had worked very hard to move our spring fair from April to May and avoid the difficulties of the ever moving Easter. We had lots of things planned to make it even more of a special occasion than usual. Our team is never short of ideas and rest assured the next Decorative Fair, once we are allowed to open, will be full of those ideas. You’ll have to wait and see. 

ANF:  Is there anything you will do differently at The Decorative Fair in general when we get through this crisis apart from what will be required of event organisers by Government regulations?

DH: It will be interesting to see what those Government regulations are and we will act on them accordingly.

We believe in the success of The Decorative Fair and don’t change things just for the sake of change. The Fair has evolved a lot over the past 35 years but changes are implemented gradually. Exhibitors and visitors alike appreciate the change best when it’s not too obvious. There may be some imposed changes but we will do our best to retain The Decorative Fair atmosphere and feel.

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair

ANF:  What feedback are you getting from your exhibitors during the crisis?  How are they surviving without the fairs taking place?

DH: Although many of our exhibitors rely on our three fairs a year, it is important to remember that each and every one of them is an independent business. It never surprises me just how resourceful they can be and how upbeat the response from them has been. Many have expressed their support for us. Some have closed shop and are waiting it out. Some are working through a backlog of long overdue projects. Some are working on pushing their website or improving or even creating new websites. Others are pushing social media especially Instagram to keep things moving. Quite a few are still buying where they can. Each of them knows what is best for them and what they feel they need to do. It’s opening up new opportunities, allowing us to deal with things we’ve put off for too long and adding to our business. Everyone is eager to see the day return when we can get back out there, chat with our friends, travel with our friends and buy and sell with our friends; after all for many of us that’s why we love our job. But until then everyone I have spoken to is remaining positive and doing whatever is best for them.

We as a business have to preserve funds while looking after our dealers. We are sustaining huge losses as our Fairs are booked years in advance and cancellations are costly. We want to do the right thing and have refunded deposits or carried them over to future Fairs. Unlike some businesses we are taking the hit for the benefit of our exhibitors. We hope this won’t continue for too long though.

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair

ANF:  From the feedback we have from dealers there is a reasonable amount of business taking place in the domestic market where delivery or storage is an option but export sales are less easy.  Would you agree from your conversations with clients?

DH: Yes export sales have been slow for most. If it’s small and can be posted then there are obvious advantages. Some dealers are reporting sales and delivery of larger items either to second homes or with social distancing. It’s understandable that people could worry when they will receive their purchases, but with free storage and the old adage ‘you’ve got to buy it when you see it’ it’s a great time to buy. I have bought many items in Italy, France, Spain and the UK just waiting to be collected. I’m not sure when I’ll get them but they are worth the wait, plus the cash injection for the dealers ensures they’ll still be there when things return a little more towards normal.

ANF:  We have noticed a significant spike in the Decorative Fair followers on Instagram, now around 20k? Do you think the Covid-19 crisis has contributed to this increase?

DH: Instagram is great for this trade as it’s all about the visual. We have the lovely Henrietta with her experience at The World of Interiors who is solely responsible for our posts. Henrietta posts Instagram stories with links to the dealer’s website and encourages dealers to provide her with interesting high res images. Plus our PR team headed up by Pippa Roberts have ensured we have LOTS of beautiful images from previous Fairs to inspire and keep us in people’s minds. We have been steadily increasing but I’m sure with more people having to stay home and missing us, online is the only way to view at the moment. It has definitely had an impact.

ANF:  We usually ask our correspondents what they do to relax from their busy schedule but maybe we can ask how you spend your time during lockdown? 

DH: I live with my wife Amber, our 2 year old son Harvey and Daisy our Jack Russell. We are very lucky. We live just outside Windsor and along with the good weather we’ve had, there are definitely worse places to be under lockdown.

I often work from home: I only get in the way in the office! I correspond with Jane and the Team regularly and we meet up when needed.

At the moment the mornings are spent catching up on the latest news. Any changes are important as we look towards our next planned Fair 29 September – 4 October 2020. We have to continue preparations to ensure we are ready to proceed. Our contractors, the venue and all the people who are backstage at our Fair are in a similar position and it’s important to keep in contact with them.

I speak with many of our dealers and friends. I receive a lot of phone calls checking for updates and reassurance of our September/October Fair and kindly checking on our wellbeing.

In line with social distancing I visit my warehouse weekly. It is close by and I swap over finished projects with new ones.

The highlight of the lockdown is being able to spend so much time with our son. Life is definitely not sitting around doing nothing. Harvey has inherited my inability to sit still. He loves our bike rides and dog walks as all his other activities are on hold at the moment. He’s 2 going on 22 and is learning to drive our little boat. It gives me enormous pleasure to see him take the tiller even if he does try to go a bit fast!

Early evening is back to watching the news update, emails and possibly a glass of wine or two...

And repeat

And repeat!!!

 Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair


 

 



News & Fairs Previews

An Eye on the Calendar - Darren Hudson - The Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair

Continuing our series An Eye on the Calendar we talk to Darren Hudson, Director of the Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair which was planned to open on Thursday May 14 - Monday May 18 2020 -  the first year with new calendar dates to avoid the Easter Holiday.


Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair

 

Affectionately known in the trade as ‘Battersea’, this is the Titan event of the international decorative trade taking place 3 times a year and forming the cornerstone of the business of many of its 180 exhibitors from UK and Europe. Darren speaks candidly about the challenges they face as a central London event with heavy contractual commitments and how they are keeping the Battersea club spirit going during the crisis the industry is dealing with.

To set the scene we wanted to include this wonderful endorsement of the Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair from leading decorative dealer Spencer Swaffer (written for the occasion of the Fair’s 30th birthday in 2015):


"Antiques dealers are basically loners who plough their own furrows. What makes Battersea unique is the way it unites a whole band of competitive hunters into a united, amiable bunch of friends for a few days three times a year.  It is that cheerfulness which shines out of Battersea and makes it such a joy to visit. Anywhere that allows dogs clearly has its heart in the right place.  Being first in the queue of buyers, first out of the traps and into the stands, has always been a closely fought battle. It [the opening day queue] used to be the domain of two of the greatest dealers of the late 20th century, the late Guinevere Weaver, who'd leave her Kings Road store early doors to be first in line, and the late Toby Landey, flying in from New York to buy for her Sentimento store.  They knew they'd find great things. We all knew we'd learn something: a new theme, a new look, a subtle nuance, a way of putting things together, a different finish for a standard bit of furniture, a twist of old fabric to jazz up a chair.  Battersea taught us the values of rust, the brutalist shock of industrial, that bleach isn't just something to throw down the toilet but a way to transform a dull commode. Battersea rules and under the amiable ownership of the excellent David Juran it has reached new heights encouraging new dealers and attracting the old guard from more stuffy shows." Spencer Swaffer.

Read the full history of The Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair in our feature to celebrate the 30th Anniversary in our feature Antiques & Design Listing - Battersea


Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair



An Eye on the Calendar -

Darren Hudson, Director The Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair


ANF:  You were a dealer and long time exhibitor and subsequently turned co-organiser of this stellar, established and celebrated fair brand - tell us how you navigated this route after David died.

David was very much a leader and a force of nature at the fair and in the antiques trade and is much missed by us all.  He was a benefactor to many, Mark Hill and I remember his generosity in hosting the launch of Antiques Young Guns with a huge stand and a catered launch party with his friend Nicky Haslam to present the awards – this was typical of his endorsement of the trade.

You were close friends and he introduced you to your wife Amber.  How did you navigate this difficult path and what do you think David would say about how you and Jane Juran, his wife, and the team have taken the fair on?

DH: It’s no secret that David and I were close. Anyone who has lost a close friend will know how that feels.

Initially I offered to oversee the next Fair which was only a few months away. It seemed sensible having spent so much time around the Fair and having an understanding of the logistics. I had spent a lot of time with David’s family and consequently Jane was also a friend. Without exception everyone in the Team, the contractors and the exhibitors were amazing. Not one person moaned, everyone just got on with it.

After our Autumn Fair Jane decided that she would like to continue running the Fairs and assume the helm. She asked if I would help, and offer a dealer prospective. It was paramount that something that she and David had worked so hard for should continue, but only on an upward trajectory. Understandably I accepted. It was important for me to support Jane and help protect what was such an important Fair for dealers and myself.

Jane and I work well together. She is determined to maintain it as dealer-focused Fair. We tend to be on the same page all of the time and have the best interests of The Fair at heart. I know I can talk to her about anything. With a small but dedicated team alongside us I hope we produce a vibrant and exciting event to visit, and a successful and friendly Fair to exhibit at. Just as with David, exhibitors can find one of us at any time to discuss concerns, issues or just have a drink. It’s still a Family Fair both in the organisational team and the exhibitors.  I like to think that the Fair is something that David would be proud of. I’m proud to be part of its journey. I know for certain that he would be pleased that the Fair was looking as well as it is, though there is no doubt he would be furious that he’s missing out on all that dealing! 

 

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair


ANF:  What was your first job and did it prepare you for the vagaries of the antiques trade – and its members!

DH: Apart from the number of mundane jobs just to earn some money, from a very early age I had decided on a career as an actor. I pursued this for many years with my first professional job at the age of 12. I continued working off and on for a further 20 years. Although in some ways it seems miles apart from the antique trade, the similarities are many. Both have a mix of characters and a very similar outlook on life. Both have people who work incredibly hard with distorted hours and whose skills and dedication isn’t always recognised as much as it should be. People skills are important in both, as is being able to interact with people from all walks of life. In addition many antiques dealers I have met deserve to be on the stage!

ANF:  When did you start dealing? We heard you started with Patricia Harvey who was of course the Grand Dame of Battersea as the founder more than 35 years ago! What was your breakout moment to go it alone?

DH: The fantastic Patricia was a dancer in her youth and therefore had a soft spot for people in the arts. She took me under her wing and allowed me to continue with acting jobs as they came in along with teaching me what she did best. I watched her run the Decorative Fair, helping in the office and progressed to running her shop in Marylebone’s Church Street. I also helped out at her weekly Sunday Fairs. Almost immediately the fascination of this amazing industry grabbed me. It was only a matter of time before the purchases initially made for myself became purchases made to sell on. Patricia and her daughter Victoria were very supportive and bought most of my early acquisitions.... MOST of which she sold. She encouraged me to exhibit at the Decorative Fair when the time was right. Probably as she couldn’t remain my only customer! I can’t remember in what year but it was over 20 years ago!

 

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair


 

ANF:  Talking to your long-standing exhibitors at The Decorative Fair, how do you think they compare the fair today from the 80s?  How many of your current roster were there at the beginning?

DH: ‘The 80’s were fantastic’ is the usual comment I hear. The economy was booming and many couldn’t buy it as quickly as they could sell it. The Decorative market was just emerging and the export market was strong. Cash was king. In the years in between business has undoubtedly got more difficult with recessions coming and going. Shops are less attractive for some and the internet has established its place as a selling format - and when was the last time someone paid in cash??

We have quite a few dealers who were with us at the fairs in the 80’s, some who were at our very first Fair, and who have supported and followed the Fair to its present home in Battersea. We also actively encourage new younger dealers to ensure the business continues with their fresh take on things. The general consensus is that while the Fairs of the 80’s are fondly remembered The Decorative Fair is stronger than ever. It has allowed some to relinquish their shops and concentrate on preparing for three big selling weeks in their calendar. The brand new Marquee and its central location allow many dealers access to clients they would struggle to meet otherwise. Where else could a relatively new dealer have access to a billionaire, a movie star or a member of the Royal Family? It still allows an outlet for the weird and wonderful alongside the day to day staples with everything in between. The Fair retains its sense of fun and comradeship. ‘The Buzz’ is a word often associated with The Decorative Fair along with ‘The Battersea Family’ and hopefully that will continue for the next 35 years.

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair


ANF:There is no denying or escaping the fact that fair organisers and the dealers who exhibit with them, have been hit very hard in the current crisis.  What are your thoughts and plans for when we come out the other side? Do you have anything planned to celebrate your return?

DH: This crisis hit very quickly and initially we underestimated its impact. Both Jane and I were determined to go ahead and like most dealers continue in the face of adversity. As the realisation of the seriousness became clear we were forced to make the incredibly difficult decision to cancel for the safety of us all. We had worked very hard to move our spring fair from April to May and avoid the difficulties of the ever moving Easter. We had lots of things planned to make it even more of a special occasion than usual. Our team is never short of ideas and rest assured the next Decorative Fair, once we are allowed to open, will be full of those ideas. You’ll have to wait and see. 

ANF:  Is there anything you will do differently at The Decorative Fair in general when we get through this crisis apart from what will be required of event organisers by Government regulations?

DH: It will be interesting to see what those Government regulations are and we will act on them accordingly.

We believe in the success of The Decorative Fair and don’t change things just for the sake of change. The Fair has evolved a lot over the past 35 years but changes are implemented gradually. Exhibitors and visitors alike appreciate the change best when it’s not too obvious. There may be some imposed changes but we will do our best to retain The Decorative Fair atmosphere and feel.

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair

ANF:  What feedback are you getting from your exhibitors during the crisis?  How are they surviving without the fairs taking place?

DH: Although many of our exhibitors rely on our three fairs a year, it is important to remember that each and every one of them is an independent business. It never surprises me just how resourceful they can be and how upbeat the response from them has been. Many have expressed their support for us. Some have closed shop and are waiting it out. Some are working through a backlog of long overdue projects. Some are working on pushing their website or improving or even creating new websites. Others are pushing social media especially Instagram to keep things moving. Quite a few are still buying where they can. Each of them knows what is best for them and what they feel they need to do. It’s opening up new opportunities, allowing us to deal with things we’ve put off for too long and adding to our business. Everyone is eager to see the day return when we can get back out there, chat with our friends, travel with our friends and buy and sell with our friends; after all for many of us that’s why we love our job. But until then everyone I have spoken to is remaining positive and doing whatever is best for them.

We as a business have to preserve funds while looking after our dealers. We are sustaining huge losses as our Fairs are booked years in advance and cancellations are costly. We want to do the right thing and have refunded deposits or carried them over to future Fairs. Unlike some businesses we are taking the hit for the benefit of our exhibitors. We hope this won’t continue for too long though.

Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair

ANF:  From the feedback we have from dealers there is a reasonable amount of business taking place in the domestic market where delivery or storage is an option but export sales are less easy.  Would you agree from your conversations with clients?

DH: Yes export sales have been slow for most. If it’s small and can be posted then there are obvious advantages. Some dealers are reporting sales and delivery of larger items either to second homes or with social distancing. It’s understandable that people could worry when they will receive their purchases, but with free storage and the old adage ‘you’ve got to buy it when you see it’ it’s a great time to buy. I have bought many items in Italy, France, Spain and the UK just waiting to be collected. I’m not sure when I’ll get them but they are worth the wait, plus the cash injection for the dealers ensures they’ll still be there when things return a little more towards normal.

ANF:  We have noticed a significant spike in the Decorative Fair followers on Instagram, now around 20k? Do you think the Covid-19 crisis has contributed to this increase?

DH: Instagram is great for this trade as it’s all about the visual. We have the lovely Henrietta with her experience at The World of Interiors who is solely responsible for our posts. Henrietta posts Instagram stories with links to the dealer’s website and encourages dealers to provide her with interesting high res images. Plus our PR team headed up by Pippa Roberts have ensured we have LOTS of beautiful images from previous Fairs to inspire and keep us in people’s minds. We have been steadily increasing but I’m sure with more people having to stay home and missing us, online is the only way to view at the moment. It has definitely had an impact.

ANF:  We usually ask our correspondents what they do to relax from their busy schedule but maybe we can ask how you spend your time during lockdown? 

DH: I live with my wife Amber, our 2 year old son Harvey and Daisy our Jack Russell. We are very lucky. We live just outside Windsor and along with the good weather we’ve had, there are definitely worse places to be under lockdown.

I often work from home: I only get in the way in the office! I correspond with Jane and the Team regularly and we meet up when needed.

At the moment the mornings are spent catching up on the latest news. Any changes are important as we look towards our next planned Fair 29 September – 4 October 2020. We have to continue preparations to ensure we are ready to proceed. Our contractors, the venue and all the people who are backstage at our Fair are in a similar position and it’s important to keep in contact with them.

I speak with many of our dealers and friends. I receive a lot of phone calls checking for updates and reassurance of our September/October Fair and kindly checking on our wellbeing.

In line with social distancing I visit my warehouse weekly. It is close by and I swap over finished projects with new ones.

The highlight of the lockdown is being able to spend so much time with our son. Life is definitely not sitting around doing nothing. Harvey has inherited my inability to sit still. He loves our bike rides and dog walks as all his other activities are on hold at the moment. He’s 2 going on 22 and is learning to drive our little boat. It gives me enormous pleasure to see him take the tiller even if he does try to go a bit fast!

Early evening is back to watching the news update, emails and possibly a glass of wine or two...

And repeat

And repeat!!!

 Antiquews News & Fairs - Decorative Antiques & Textiles Fair