Antiques News & Fairs Previews
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News & Fairs Previews

BBC Fake or Fortune? Looking Back


This summer saw the return of the hit series Fake or Fortune? to BBC One which now now, in its seventh series, has gained a loyal following of over 5 million viewers in the UK since it first aired in June 2011. It has fast become the most popular arts show in the country. 

The programme has all the necessary ingredients to keep viewers glued to the screen with engaging presentation from the glamorous duo, BBC presenter Fiona Bruce and art dealer Philip Mould, art history, social history, real life people stories and of course the potential jeopardy factor at the end.

The final episode of this season aired on Sunday 9 September 2018 and we’re looking back at the series over the past five weeks.

Don’t worry, if you are yet to catch up with the show there will be no spoilers ahead and all four episodes are now available on BBC iPlayer.
 

Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back

Journalist Fiona Bruce teamedhttp://www.t-mobile.co.uk/shop/pay-monthly/samsung-galaxy-note/mobile-tariffs/# up with art expert Philip Mould to investigate mysteries behind paintings.

The first episode (which aired in the UK on Sunday 12 August) saw the team attempt to prove that a still life of a jug and pears purchased as being by the British painter William Nicholson (1872-1949) was in fact genuine. William Nicholson (1872-1949) was one of the preeminent British artists of his day. Primarily known as a painter of still lifes, landscapes and portraits, Nicholson was also a sophisticated engraver and illustrator, his most notable examples in this media being his lithograph of HM Queen Victoria (1899) and his illustration work for Margery Williams’s children’s classic The Velveteen Rabbit (1922).
 
To find out the result of this episode go to BBC iPlayer.

Antiques News & Fairs - BBC - Fake or Fortune ? Returns


 Still Life of a Jug and Pears (Will this turn out to be an authentic William Nicholson?)


Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back

The collection of sketches reportedly by the French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901).

Up next in the series (aired in the UK on Sunday 19 August) came one of the toughest investigations the team have faced so far; a thorough quest to try and authenticate a collection of sketches reportedly by the French artist and celebrated cataloguer of nightlife characters during the Parisian Belle Époch, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901). The sketches, enclosed in two sketchbooks, were found in a garden shed in St Emilion, France and were given to a young boy named Alain by his grandmother in 1965. When Alain, under the belief that these were by the hand of Toulouse-Lautrec, sought out the expertise of the French committee responsible for authenticating works by the artist over fifty years later, they were regrettably rejected as genuine works.

The team had to build up as much evidence as possible, including supportive scientific analysis using the most advanced technology available prior to an official meeting of the committee designated to review potential works by Toulouse-Lautrec. Did Philip and Fiona have enough to convince the committee to re-evaluate the works and change their minds? Watch episode two on BBC iPlayer to find out.

Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back

The small watercolour sketch by the British 20th-century sculptor Henry Moore (1898-1986) or was it?

Episode three of the series saw the team investigate whether a small watercolour sketch could be by the British 20th-century sculptor Henry Moore (1898-1986). It is the only piece thought to be by a British artist in a Nazi hoard of around 1,500 works discovered in Germany in 2012. Known as the Gurlitt hoard, it is now housed in the Museum of Fine Art in Bern, Switzerland.

Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back
Portraits depicting black sitters.

The next episode made a departure in approach as the team took on two separate portraits depicting black sitters. Painted with extraordinary skill and sophistication, both pictures are highly unusual in their positive depiction of black sitters at a time when Britain was still heavily engaged in slavery. The team were tasked with hunting down the purpose behind these intriguing works and also the identities of the artists responsible for these seemingly forward-thinking paintings.


Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back

The plaster sculpture simply known as ‘The Gazing Head’.

The final episode of series 7 aired on Sunday 9 September BBC One. This time Philip and Fiona were on the quest to prove that plaster sculpture simply known as ‘The Gazing Head’ thought to be by the Swiss-born artist and pioneer of modernism Alberto Giacometti (1901-66) is indeed by him. The work itself is strikingly similar to one in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York but will this be enough to determine its authenticity?

The programme will be available to watch here on ,




News & Fairs Previews

BBC Fake or Fortune? Looking Back


This summer saw the return of the hit series Fake or Fortune? to BBC One which now now, in its seventh series, has gained a loyal following of over 5 million viewers in the UK since it first aired in June 2011. It has fast become the most popular arts show in the country. 

The programme has all the necessary ingredients to keep viewers glued to the screen with engaging presentation from the glamorous duo, BBC presenter Fiona Bruce and art dealer Philip Mould, art history, social history, real life people stories and of course the potential jeopardy factor at the end.

The final episode of this season aired on Sunday 9 September 2018 and we’re looking back at the series over the past five weeks.

Don’t worry, if you are yet to catch up with the show there will be no spoilers ahead and all four episodes are now available on BBC iPlayer.
 

Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back

Journalist Fiona Bruce teamedhttp://www.t-mobile.co.uk/shop/pay-monthly/samsung-galaxy-note/mobile-tariffs/# up with art expert Philip Mould to investigate mysteries behind paintings.

The first episode (which aired in the UK on Sunday 12 August) saw the team attempt to prove that a still life of a jug and pears purchased as being by the British painter William Nicholson (1872-1949) was in fact genuine. William Nicholson (1872-1949) was one of the preeminent British artists of his day. Primarily known as a painter of still lifes, landscapes and portraits, Nicholson was also a sophisticated engraver and illustrator, his most notable examples in this media being his lithograph of HM Queen Victoria (1899) and his illustration work for Margery Williams’s children’s classic The Velveteen Rabbit (1922).
 
To find out the result of this episode go to BBC iPlayer.

Antiques News & Fairs - BBC - Fake or Fortune ? Returns


 Still Life of a Jug and Pears (Will this turn out to be an authentic William Nicholson?)


Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back

The collection of sketches reportedly by the French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901).

Up next in the series (aired in the UK on Sunday 19 August) came one of the toughest investigations the team have faced so far; a thorough quest to try and authenticate a collection of sketches reportedly by the French artist and celebrated cataloguer of nightlife characters during the Parisian Belle Époch, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901). The sketches, enclosed in two sketchbooks, were found in a garden shed in St Emilion, France and were given to a young boy named Alain by his grandmother in 1965. When Alain, under the belief that these were by the hand of Toulouse-Lautrec, sought out the expertise of the French committee responsible for authenticating works by the artist over fifty years later, they were regrettably rejected as genuine works.

The team had to build up as much evidence as possible, including supportive scientific analysis using the most advanced technology available prior to an official meeting of the committee designated to review potential works by Toulouse-Lautrec. Did Philip and Fiona have enough to convince the committee to re-evaluate the works and change their minds? Watch episode two on BBC iPlayer to find out.

Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back

The small watercolour sketch by the British 20th-century sculptor Henry Moore (1898-1986) or was it?

Episode three of the series saw the team investigate whether a small watercolour sketch could be by the British 20th-century sculptor Henry Moore (1898-1986). It is the only piece thought to be by a British artist in a Nazi hoard of around 1,500 works discovered in Germany in 2012. Known as the Gurlitt hoard, it is now housed in the Museum of Fine Art in Bern, Switzerland.

Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back
Portraits depicting black sitters.

The next episode made a departure in approach as the team took on two separate portraits depicting black sitters. Painted with extraordinary skill and sophistication, both pictures are highly unusual in their positive depiction of black sitters at a time when Britain was still heavily engaged in slavery. The team were tasked with hunting down the purpose behind these intriguing works and also the identities of the artists responsible for these seemingly forward-thinking paintings.


Antiques News & Fairs - Fake or Fortune? Looking Back

The plaster sculpture simply known as ‘The Gazing Head’.

The final episode of series 7 aired on Sunday 9 September BBC One. This time Philip and Fiona were on the quest to prove that plaster sculpture simply known as ‘The Gazing Head’ thought to be by the Swiss-born artist and pioneer of modernism Alberto Giacometti (1901-66) is indeed by him. The work itself is strikingly similar to one in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York but will this be enough to determine its authenticity?

The programme will be available to watch here on ,